Resources
Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) are a new technology niché which has given us the ability to view things from different angles and heights which even manned aircraft are unable to do.
Canada has long been a global leader in the development of new technologies and processes to add value and enhance operations in aviation and aerospace, so it’s certainly not surprising to see organizations from coast-to-coast taking leadership roles in the rapidly developing unmanned space.
Unmanned Systems Canada has announced that the Government of Canada has released draft regulations for unmanned aircraft systems (UAS or drones) operations for public comment in Canada Gazette Part One.
The ASIS Toronto Chapter held its 24th annual Best Practices seminar in Markham, Ont., last week, highlighting topics of interest to security professionals such as job mobility and industry image, the evolution of the CSO role, unmanned systems, insider threats, active shooter scenarios, and security features in Canadian bank notes.
Demand for unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), or drones, in the U.S. is projected to rise 10 per cent annually to US$4.4 billion in 2020, and the number of vehicles sold will more than double to 5.5 million, according to research from The Freedonia Group.
Transport Canada recently issued a statement outlining safety initiatives regarding the use of drones, including a new incident-reporting tool.
Demand for unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), or drones, in the U.S. is projected to rise 10 per cent annually to US$4.4 billion in 2020, and the number of vehicles sold will more than double to 5.5 million, according to research from The Freedonia Group.
David Kroetsch is as cool as the products his cutting-edge firm creates.
Sometime in 2017, flight-testing should begin on a 300-kilogram twin-rotor helicopter – said by its Quebec-based developer, Laflamme Aero, to be the biggest unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) in Canada and one of the largest civil UAVs to be commercialized in the world.
On the eve of the 2016 Unmanned Systems Canada conference in Edmonton Nov. 1-3, chairmain of the board Mark Aruja shared his insights with UAV about the state of the Canadian unmanned space and what needs to be done to grow the industry.
During a HAC committee meeting a few years ago, an associate member made a statement that, at the time, I found a little shocking and, I confess, a little insulting. The offending statement was along the lines of “as soon as drones are available, I will never have a pilot on a project.” At the time, it seemed to be the stuff of science fiction.
The skies are filling with two-kilogram mechanical birds. Millions of them. Regulators are scrambling to keep up with the swarm of demand. Personal-injury lawyers are salivating over a new category of accidents. Electronics retailers are anticipating a robust holiday season.
Page 1 of 2

Most Popular

We are using cookies to give you the best experience on our website. By continuing to use the site, you agree to the use of cookies. To find out more, read our Privacy Policy.